Tag Archives: travel

Yarn paintings

Huichol yarn painting is a traditional artistic technique that is used for recording dreams, visions, myths, and the innermost personal prayers of the artists. Because the Huichol language is non-written, these story boards are used to express the beauty and wisdom of the ancient Huichol cultural tradition. Huichol artists can be thought of as modern day scribes.

The Huichols use smaller version of these paintings as offerings to the many gods and goddesses that reign over their isolated homeland in the Sierra Madre mountain range in Mexico.

Yarn paintings originate from votive objects the Huichols create as ceremonial offerings. The small wax and yarn votive objects are made as prayers to depict the desires of the people and their families. After the ceremonies they are taken to far off sacred places and left for the gods and goddesses.

The larger paintings, made by Huichol artists for sale, utilize the same technique for placing strands of yarn onto a thin surface of beeswax mixed with pine resin that has been spread onto a wooden board. It is a meticulous and time consuming art form that may be a successor to the featherworking techniques of the Huichol ancestors, the Aztecs.

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Beaded masks

These beautiful, one-of-a-kind beaded masks where made by pressing tiny glass beads into natural beeswax spread over a paper-mache form. Bead art is made in limited quantities by the Huichol and Tepehuano Indians of southwestern Mexico. Click here for additional information on the Huichol people and how this art was made.

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Huichol Art Exhibition

The Consulate General of Mexico in Denver and the Mexican Cultural Center, in coordination with The Sebastian Hotel, are hosting an exhibition of Huichol art that will be open for the public beginning today at the Sebastian Hotel in Vail, Colorado.

The exhibition offers the viewer an opportunity to experience one of the most important and unique cultures of Mexico. The Huichol, also known as Wirraritari or Wirrarika, they have managed to preserve their way of life and maintain a spiritual relationship with the universe through complex rituals and ceremonies.

It was during the 17th century that under the influence of Christianity, the Huichol people adopted a dual faith, pagan and Christian. These beliefs remain to this day and are linked both to nature and their ancestors. Continue reading

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Yarn paintings

Huichol yarn painting is a traditional artistic technique that is used for recording dreams, visions, myths, and the innermost personal prayers of the artists. Because the Huichol language is non-written, these story boards are used to express the beauty and wisdom of the ancient Huichol cultural tradition. Huichol artists can be thought of as modern day scribes.

Click here to see more Huichol yarn paintings.

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Bildungs TV – The Huichol indians on German television

Leopoldine Ganser made an item about the Huichol indians on ‘Bildungs TV’.

Link: Bildungs.TV – bildungsthemen – Top Events – Huicholindianer.

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Beaded eclipses

The eclipse has special meaning for the Huichol, because it represents the eclipse of July 11 1991 at 10:21 a.m. Pacific Coast time. This is the sixth sun according to the ancient Meso-American Calendars of the Maya. When Cortez arrived it was the begining of the fifth sun. As we all know, Cortez changed their world more than any other force they had ever encountered in their past. Evidently they are expecting some large scale Earth changes according to their divine cosmology.

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The Huichol Center for Cultural Survival and the Traditional Arts

The Huichol Center:

Many miles away, in the desert region of San Luis Potosi, in an area that has been designated by UNESCO as a world biodiversity reserve, the aquifers and ecosystems are under siege by mining companies and agro business polluters who have illegally obtained land, water and mining rights. While the Huichols hold title to their lands in their mountain homeland, they do not have formal title to the sacred sites on these desert lands that they consider to be their primordial paradise.

 Their annual migration to this peyote habitat, “Wirikuta”, is the root of their cultural identity because it honors a sacred covenant between the Huichol people and their creators. The collection of sacred waters from the springs in this desert oasis and the harvesting of peyote for their ceremonies are a cornerstone of Huichol ceremonial life.

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“El Vochol”

The Vochol is a Volkswagen (VW) Beetle that has been decorated with traditional Huichol (Wirrárika) beadwork from the center-west of Mexico. The name is a combination of “vocho”, a popular term for VW Beetles in Mexico, and “Huichol”, the common name of the Wirrárika indigenous group.The project was sponsored by agencies associated with the Museo de Arte Popular, Mexico City, the states of Jalisco and Nayarit and other public and private organizations. The Volkswagen was covered in 2,277,000 beads applied by eight artisans from two Huichol families in an exclusive design based on Huichol culture. Work on the car was finished in late 2010.

The work was sponsored by a number of private and public organizations including the Association of Friends of the Museo de Arte Popular, Secretaría de Cultura del Gobierno of the state of Jalisco and the Consejo Estatal para la Cultura y las Artes of the state of Nayarit. The purpose of the work was to create a folk art project for the 21st century that demonstrated the ritual nature, skill and culture of Huichol beadwork is a traditional Huichol craft that began by decorating bull horns, then gourds, masks, and jaguar head figures. Originally the craft was done with seeds, but is today done with plastic and glass beads. The craft is still evolving and the beadwork can be found on various modern materials, such as glass, stone, ceramics and metal. Traditionally, the beads are affixed with a kind of wax that comes from Campeche. Continue reading

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Huichol ‘cosmic portal’ peyote ceremonies threatened by silver mine

A guide from nearby town Real de Catorce walks on Cerro del Quemado mountain. On the top of the mountain are shrines and offerings left by the Huichol Indians during their ceremonies. The mountain is where the Huichol believe the sun was born, ending the universal darkness.

 
 
REAL DE CATORCE, Mexico — For the Huichol Indians, the desert mountains here are sacred, a cosmic portal with major mojo, where shamans collect the peyote that fuels the waking dreams that hold the universe together.

For a Canadian mining company, these same hills look like a billion dollars worth of buried silver. 

 

In a stark collision of cultures, the famously mystical Huichol are trying to stop a $100 million, 15-year mining project from starting this year. Their struggle comes as indigenous people from Alaska to the Amazon are rallying to protect not just their environment but also their cultures from decay.
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Hundreds of Mexico’s Huichol Indians trek to their sacred ground seeking to stop silver mine

REAL DE CATORCE, Mexico — Huichol Indians believe the sun was born in a spot high in the arid Sierra de Catorce mountain range of northern Mexico.

For them, that spot — the Cerro del Quemado, or the Burned Mountain — is the center of the universe, a sacred ground.

 ( Christian Palma / Associated Press ) – this photo taken on Monday Feb. 6, 2012, Huichol Indians walk to the sacred Cerro del Quemado, or the Burned Mountain, on the Wirikuta reserve near Real de Catorce, Mexico. The Huichol Indians made the seven day walk as part of an annual pilgrimage to the site they consider the center of the universe and where the sun was born. This year they are asking their deities to guide them as they try to stop a $100 million mining project that is part of a mining concession granted to Canada-based First Majestic Silver Corp. The reserve is one of UNESCO’s World Network of Natural Sacred Sites and the Huichols beleive the project would devastate their cultural and religious heritage.

 
It’s also part of a mining concession Mexico’s government granted to Canada-based First Majestic Silver Corp., and Huichols are fighting to block the project. Continue reading
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